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Why am I tired all the time?

Why am I tired all the time?

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Feeling drained and lethargic? It might be because you were binge-watching into the small hours - but it might not. Chronic fatigue can be caused by not enough sleep or maybe it's your body's way of trying to tell you something.

You live a stressful life juggling the conflicting demands of work, family, friends and the occasional night out. You spend time in front of a screen and on video calls and certainly don't have time to waste trying to get an appointment to see your doctor.  

Take control of your health by finding out what's behind your constant fatigue. Get peace of mind or confirmation that you need medical advice for a specific problem. 

The "Why am I tired all the time?" test checks 31 biomarkers across your body including an in-depth analysis of your thyroid, iron levels, kidneys and blood as well as your Vitamin D levels and your C-reactive protein to check for any signs of inflammation or infection.

This simple at-home blood test is sent to your door with full instructions on how to complete the test and send it off to our laboratory using the pre-paid envelope and packaging.

All our blood samples are analysed at leading UK laboratories which are accredited by UKAS to ISO15189 standards reflecting the highest standards of pathology.

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This test includes the following biomarkers. For full details on each of these tests see the "Full Description" tab

• High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP)

• Full Blood Count (Basophils, Eosinophils, Haemoglobin, Haematocrit, Lymphocytes, Mean Cell Haemoglobin, Mean Corpuscular Volume, Mean Platelet Volume, MCHC, Monocytes, Neutrophils, Platelet Count, RBC Distribution Width, Red Blood Cell, White Blood Cell Count, Neutrophils %, Lymphocytes %, Monocytes %)

• Full Iron Profile (Ferritin, Iron Serum, TIBC - Total Iron Binding Capacity, UIBC - Unsaturated Iron Binding Capacity, Transferrin Saturation)

• Kidney function test (Creatinine, eGFR, Urea)

• Thyroid function test (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Triiodothyronine (T3, free), Thyroxine (FT4))

• Vitamin D

Tiredness can be a sign of deeper issues with your health. Get ahead of any problems by taking this test and checking your key biomarkers.

This test includes the following biomarkers:

• High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP) - Heart disease is usually as a result of fatty deposits in the arteries causing narrowing and poor blood supply. This blood test measures markers of inflammation specific to this process and can help to predict an otherwise well person’s cardiac risk.


• Full Blood Count - This is a blood test measuring different types and number of cells in the blood including white cells (infection/immune response), red blood cells (to carry oxygen) and platelets (immune and blood clotting function). It gives a good indication of body health and can help detect many medical conditions.

Basophils - Basophils are one of the several kinds of white blood cells you have in your body. Basophils are a part of your immune system and are created inside of your bone marrow

Eosinophils - Eosinophils are a kind of white blood cell that helps fight disease; they're usually linked with allergic diseases and certain infections. They're made in your bone marrow and then travel to different tissues.

Haemoglobin - About 70 percent of your body's iron is found in the red blood cells of your blood called haemoglobin and in muscle cells called myoglobin. haemoglobin is essential for transferring oxygen in your blood from the lungs to the tissues.

Haematocrit - The haematocrit, also known by several other names, is the volume percentage of red blood cells in blood, measured as part of a blood test. Having too few or too many red blood cells can be a sign of certain diseases.

Lymphocytes - Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell. They’re an important part of your immune system. About 20% to 40% of your white blood cells are lymphocytes.

Mean Cell Haemoglobin - The mean cell haemoglobin, or "mean corpuscular haemoglobin", is the average mass of haemoglobin per red blood cell in a sample of blood. A low MCH value typically indicates the presence of iron deficiency anaemia; while high MCH value can often be caused by anaemia due to a deficiency of B vitamins, particularly B-12 and folate

Mean Corpuscular Volume - The mean corpuscular volume, or mean cell volume, is a measure of the average volume (or size) of a red blood corpuscle. It can help diagnose different types of anaemia and other health conditions.

Mean Platelet Volume - Platelets are small blood cells that are essential for blood clotting, the process that helps you stop bleeding after an injury. An MPV blood test measures the average size of your platelets. The test can help diagnose bleeding disorders and diseases of the bone marrow.

MCHC -Mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC). MCHC checks the average amount of haemoglobin in a group of red blood cells. This can help in the diagnosis of anaemia, a condition caused by not having enough healthy red blood cells, or the red blood cells you do have don't work as well as they should

Monocytes - Monocytes are a type of white blood cell. They are produced in the bone marrow and then enter the bloodstream. They fight certain infections and help other white blood cells remove dead or damaged cells and fight cancer cells.

Neutrophils - Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell. They make up the biggest number of all kinds of white blood cells. They kill and digest bacteria and fungi to help your body fight infections and heal wounds.

Platelet Count - A platelet count is a test that measures the number of platelets in your blood. Platelets are cells that help your blood clot. Too few platelets can be a sign of cancer, infections or other health problems. Too many platelets put you at risk for blood clots or stroke.

RBC Distribution Width - The red cell distribution width (RDW) blood test measures the amount of red blood cell variation in volume and size. You need red blood cells to carry oxygen from your lungs to every part of your body. Anything outside of the normal range in red blood cell width or volume indicates a possible problem with bodily function that in turn may affect oxygen getting to various parts of your body.

Red Blood Cell - A red blood cell count test measures how many red blood cells your blood contains. The red blood cells contain haemoglobin — a protein that transports oxygen to all parts of your body. The test helps to identify several health conditions

White Blood Cell Count - A white blood count measures the number of white cells in your blood. White blood cells are part of the immune system. They help your body fight off infections and other diseases. When you get sick, your body makes more white blood cells to fight the bacteria, viruses, or other foreign substances causing your illness.

Neutrophils % - Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cells. In healthy adults, they typically constitute about 50 to 70 percent of white blood cells and function as the first line of defence against bacteria and other foreign organisms. This percentage is what you read in your Full Blood Count as the Neutrophils %, or Relative Neutrophil Count

Lymphocytes % - Lymphocyte percentage is a measure of the number of lymphocytes represented as B cells (25%) and T cells (75%) in proportion to the white blood cell count in a single blood specimen. A high or low range of lymphocytes can suggest infection or a blood disorder

Monocytes % - Monocytes are one of the largest types of white blood cells. Each type of white blood cell has a unique role. Monocytes are responsible for attacking and breaking down germs and bacteria that enter the body. Monocytes % indicates whether the proportion of monocytes within the white blood cell count is healthy


• Full Iron Profile - Iron is a mineral in your body that comes from foods like red meat and fortified cereals or from supplements you take. You need iron to make red blood cells. Iron is also an important part of haemoglobin, a protein in your blood that helps carry oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. An iron test can show if you have too much or too little of this mineral in your system.

Ferritin - Ferritin is a protein which stores iron. This test indicates if your body's iron stores are low and you have iron deficiency or if you have too much iron. It could also point to liver disease, rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory conditions or hyperthyroidism

Iron Serum - A serum iron test measures how much iron is in your serum. Serum is the liquid that’s left over from your blood when red blood cells and clotting factors have been removed. The test can reveal abnormally low or high blood iron levels. Having too much iron — or not enough — can cause serious health problems.

TIBC - Total Iron Binding Capacity - A total iron-binding capacity test tells you how much transferrin in your blood is binding to iron, which tells you how well iron is functioning in your body.

UIBC - Unsaturated Iron Binding - Unsaturated iron-binding capacity is related to the total iron-binding capacity test and measures how much transferrin is not yet bound to iron.

Transferrin Saturation - Capacity - Your liver makes a protein called transferrin that attaches to, or binds to, iron in your blood. Once iron is bound to transferrin, it goes to your bone marrow to make red blood cells and haemoglobin, a protein that helps carry oxygen.


• Kidney function test - This blood test looks at important salts in the blood which control chemical and electrical cell processes. It also gives an indication of renal function and hydration.

Creatinine - Creatinine is a waste product from the normal breakdown of muscle tissue. This test measures how well your kidneys are working

eGFR - Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is a measure of how well your kidneys filter blood.

Urea - Urea is a waste product our bodies produce and is the major component of urine


• Thyroid function test - Thyroid hormones help to regulate important body processes such as metabolism and brain development. Under or over-active thyroid problems can present with both physical, mental and metabolic disorders. This blood test can help diagnose thyroid problems, as well as monitor and guide treatment in established cases.

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) - A TSH test is done to find out if your thyroid gland is working the way it should. It can tell you if it’s overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism).

Triiodothyronine (T3, free) - T3 is one of two major hormones made by your thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped gland located near the throat. The other hormone is called thyroxine (T4) T3 and T4 work together to regulate how your body uses energy.

Thyroxine (FT4) - T4 is one of two major hormones made by your thyroid, a small, butterfly-shaped gland located near the throat. The other hormone is called Triiodothyronine (T3.) T3 and T4 work together to regulate how your body uses energy


• Vitamin D - Vitamin D and Calcium are important for good bone health. The blood test is used to screen for and monitor bone disorders. It can also give an indication of nutritional status, organ damage and other medical conditions.



Anyone whose fatigue is not obviously caused by their lifestyle

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